Ford invents a “gas station attendant” robot.

Ford invents a “gas station attendant” robot.


No more headaches of refueling a wheelchair. Ford announces development of robotic charging stations for disabled electric vehicle drivers. But there is no commissioning date on the horizon.

“I stopped filling up my car years ago because it was boring. My husband cares about that. » For Angela Aben, going through the gas station is an obstacle for using her wheelchair. Employed in the communications department at Ford of Europe, he wishes to test out a new robotic charging station launched by the American brand, “which will allow him to be more independent”. Considering the difficulties faced by this German and other disabled drivers, Ford has created a model that allows you to charge your electric car without leaving it. It’s a robot, activated using the “FordPass” app installed on his smartphone. The charging arm is used and automatically moves towards the car’s opening, guided by a small camera. At the “perfect” end, the robot pump attendant curls up in his cabin.

For any type of electric vehicle

Made in Germany, this solution should cover the entire electric fleet, all products together, as electric outlets are universal. In the future, it can be placed in parking spaces reserved for people with disabilities, in car parks or in private homes. “Ford is testing this robotic station as part of a research project aimed at developing hands-free charging solutions for electric vehicles and automated charging for autonomous vehicles,” explains the company, which ultimately wants “Set the process perfectly, so that the driver no longer needs to intervene”. Proof that what makes life easier for people with limited mobility can be useful for as many people as possible, and vice versa! If the technology seems promising, it is, at the moment, only in the experimental phase. No official order date has been communicated by the company.

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