Dieselgate: Volkswagen pays £193m to British drivers

Dieselgate: Volkswagen pays £193m to British drivers


Wednesday’s announcement does not represent “an admission of liability, cause or loss” by the plaintiffs, Volkswagen said in a statement. (Photo: 123RF)

LONDON – German carmaker Volkswagen agreed on Wednesday to pay 193 million pounds (226 million euros) to compensate 91,000 British drivers who felt victimized by a stolen engine scam and have taken legal action.

“The Volkswagen Group and the plaintiffs have today reached an amicable settlement” of this case, the manufacturer announced in a press release, while the British justice system had decided two years earlier in favor of the drivers, but has not yet issued a decision. compensation.

The settlement “resolves approximately 91,000 claims against various Volkswagen Group entities and dealers in this class action case in England and Wales”.

In addition to the declared sum, which was distributed between the plaintiffs and their lawyers, the car group is said to contribute to the legal costs and other expenses of the plaintiffs.

In total, around 1.2 million Volkswagen, Audi, Seat and Skoda vehicles were affected in the UK by the fraud detected by the German giant in late 2015 out of a total of eleven million diesel vehicles worldwide.

London’s High Court ruled in April 2020 that Volkswagen had indeed used “cheating software” contrary to European law in cars sold in the UK to pass emissions tests.

After the decision, Volkswagen said “the matter is ongoing,” that the plaintiffs did not suffer any losses and that it should not pay them compensation.

Wednesday’s announcement does not represent “an admission of liability, cause or loss” by the plaintiffs, Volkswagen said in a statement.

But the “legal costs” that awaited him in this case, as well as possible appeal cases, “were that a peaceful settlement was the most reasonable thing,” estimated the manufacturer.

The agreement “is another important step as the Volkswagen Group continues to move forward after the very unfortunate events” that led to this case, said Philip Haarmann, Volkswagen’s chief legal officer, quoted in a press release.

Dieselgate, which has led to legal action in many countries, has already cost Volkswagen more than 30 billion euros, most of it in the United States where the German group pleaded guilty to fraud in 2017.