A Portuguese company that maintains Rolls Royce aircraft engines

A Portuguese company that maintains Rolls Royce aircraft engines


The Portuguese company has reached a historic milestone in the maintenance of Rolls-Royce engines. OGMA – Indústria Aeronautica de Portugal, SA presented the 100th engine of the AE 1107C model, which equips the Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey military aircraft – a goal achieved by the company as an Authorized Rolls-Royce Center.

As the company explains in a statement, the engine in question was being repaired in Alverca, where a “historic milestone” was marked, in a session attended by Rolls-Royce representatives.

OGMA is Rolls-Royce’s partner for the maintenance of AE 2100 A/D2/D3, AE 3007 and T56 engines and, since 2018, AE 1107C engines.

“Reaching the historic milestone of 100 AE 1107C engines delivered to Rolls-Royce is a source of great satisfaction for OGMA. It is a sign of the confidence that Rolls-Royce places in us and, at the same time, a demonstration of the capabilities and experience that our teams have to respond to the needs of our customers”, said the CEO of OGMA Alexandre Solis, quoted. the same note.

“We want to continue this partnership with more similar actions in the future, always with quality and innovation”, he added.

But there is more information. The company wants to consolidate its commitment to the maintenance segment and has invested in a new test bench offered for this model from the British aircraft manufacturer.

This AE 1107C-style test bench was “built according to industry best practices, in a four-year project to be completed in March 2022”.

It should be noted that OMGA was founded in 1918 and its activities are based on two business areas – Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul of Aircraft and Aviation and Engines and Defense Components, and Manufacturing and Assembly of Aerostructures for civil aircraft.

Since the privatization, carried out in 2005, OGMA is owned 65% by Airholding SGPS (100% EMBRAER) and 35% by idD Portugal Defense (100% Portuguese State).