10 Inexpensive JDM Cars That Are Great to Drive

10 Inexpensive JDM Cars That Are Great to Drive

JDM, which stands for Japanese Domestic Market, makes the hearts of Petrol Heads throughout the globe race. It is no longer a secret that Japan is a wellspring of wacky (or extraordinary) unusual vehicles.

Nevertheless, despite the global passion for the MX-5, GT86, and others, there has always been a dream machine that Japan chooses to enjoy by itself. Following is a preliminary effort at a list, organized by the degree of regret that it wasn’t present.

Nissan Leopard J Vacation

Top 10 Best Cars in Japan (JDM)

Admittedly, the aforementioned automobile resembles nothing or something far worse, but it is indicative of the sporty Japanese upper class, in which Toyota and Nissan have historically competed. These automobiles, which Gran Turismo fans would recognize as the Toyota Chaser or the four-door Nissan Skyline, are comparable to the BMW 5-series in idea, size, and mechanical sophistication. Rear-wheel drive, sophisticated chassis, and powerful top engines (six-cylinder turbo or V8) were and are required; often three or four variants per platform (the Leopard was related to the Cima, Gloria, and Cedric, for example) cover the complete gamut from docile to spirited.

9. Toyota Sera

Top 10 Best Cars in Japan (JDM)
The Sera is nothing more than a paseo with elegant doors, but maybe that was what was lacking from the paseo. Built only for the Japanese market from 1990 to 1996 in very modest quantities, the Sera is gradually attracting the attention of collectors.

8. Nissan Skyline 2000 RS-X Turbo C

Top 10 Best Cars in Japan (JDM)

Our model isn’t the first hot Skyline, it’s not a GT-R, it doesn’t have six cylinders or four-wheel drive, and it doesn’t earn a spot on this list since it wasn’t only sold in Japan. However, there is a positive aspect: In 1984, the most potent DR30 with 205 turbo horsepower topped the Japanese automobile hierarchy, and a lightweight variant was offered by the manufacturer. There are also victories in touring car races and, most notably, the unmistakable Japanese sports version appearance of the 1980s. Certainly a cult now.

7. DatsunBluebird

Top 10 Best Cars in Japan (JDM)

The Bluebird is more of a world vehicle than a real JDM representation; it was a global triumph for Nissan as the Datsun 510 in the United States and the Datsun 1600 in Europe. We nonetheless highlight it because, firstly, it is essentially unknown in our nation and, secondly, it is an intriguing automobile. Despite their clear inclination towards European competition, the Japanese were able to develop an independent sports sedan with a distinct personality at the time (mainly the BMW 02). The semi-trailing arm rear axle was unquestionably instrumental in gaining greater driving qualities and racing victories. Good handling, a cheap price, and Nissan‘s modular (therefore hobbyist-friendly) approach to assembly have resulted in the loss of a significant number of Bluebirds over the years.

6. Civic Type R Honda

Top 10 Best Cars in Japan (JDM)

In 1998, at the time of the EK9 Civic, Honda was the unchallenged leader in the manufacturing of compact high-revving engines, and the business consistently showed a golden touch in the creation of fast front-wheel-drive cars. The Type R of the EK9 series fully satisfies these preconceptions. In addition to the 1070kg unladen weight, the differential lock, and the racetrack-ready chassis, there is a VTEC 1600 from which Honda’s engine whisperers coaxed 185 horsepower. Without turbo, naturally.

5. Toyota Altezza RS200

Top 10 Best Cars in Japan (JDM)

Apart from the Italian moniker, the Altezza debuted in 1998 varies outwardly from its European counterpart, the first Lexus IS. In Japan, however, in addition to the six-cylinder engines, a two-liter four-cylinder engine with 210 horsepower and a few kilos of weight savings was also available. And you don’t even need to have a soft place for tiny, sporty cars to find this nice.

4. Honda NSX-R

Top 10 Best Cars in Japan (JDM)

Honda’s super sports vehicle has lost part of its grace with the addition of pop-up headlights for the 2002 facelift, making it the lightest and, if appearance is included in the ranking, arguably the best. In any event, the R version has shed some weight while simultaneously increasing the body and chassis stiffness.

Although the engine was not theoretically more powerful than the starting base, the meticulous construction with a focus on tight tolerances for the dimensions and weight of the spinning components helped to reduce friction losses and enhance revving. Then there is this fantastic color scheme: white, black, and red.

3. Autozam AZ-1

Top 10 Best Cars in Japan (JDM)

The AZ-1, created by Suzuki and sold via Mazda’s Autozam distribution channel, is the Kei car ambassador for this list. This vehicle class was highly restricted in terms of outward dimensions, cubic capacity, and performance, but in exchange, it received tax breaks and was exempt from the rigorous parking laws in major cities.

Manufacturers manufactured miniature versions of almost all vehicle categories, including compact pickup trucks, off-road vehicles, vans, and even mid-engine gullwing similar to the AZ-1. Obviously, the government was aware of the Oppenheimer and, because of the gathered motorcycle and turbo knowledge of the armament manufacturers, felt obligated to restrict not just the cubic capacity but also the horsepower (to 64 hp),

2. Eunos Cosmo

Top 10 Best Cars in Japan (JDM)

The Cosmo was Mazda’s final great Gran Turismo and was offered under Mazda’s home luxury brand, Eunos, much as the initial MX-5 was. Interestingly, we also offered its predecessor as the 929 Coupé, although unlike in Japan, without a Wankel engine. The Eunos Cosmo itself was powered only by rotary piston engines, with the top engine being the only three-rotor Wankel to ever be produced in series.

This engine had a chamber capacity of two liters and used the supercharging idea subsequently utilized in the RX-7 with two identical turbos linked in sequence. When the Cosmo arrived in 1990, it had 300 horsepower, which was plenty for a high-end luxury vehicle. The automobile was introduced in 1990, just so you don’t forget: GPS navigation and temperature control with touchscreen, TV reception, telephone, etc.

The Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution IX Wagon is the first vehicle on the list.

What is there left to say? Offering a vehicle like the Evo as a station wagon is, with all due respect, ridiculous, particularly when the back end is so Volvo-esque.